CRSQ 2021 Volume 57, Number 4


ABSTRACTS


God Floods Earth, yet Preserves Ark-Borne Humans and Animals: Exegetical and Geological Notes on Genesis Chapter 7

James J.S. Johnson and Timothy L. Clarey*

Abstract

This multidisciplinary research paper examines Genesis Chapter 7, which reports a critical timeframe during the global Flood. This study includes a verse-by-verse expository commentary on the original Hebrew text, in conjunction with integrating geological insights, gleaned from a newly compiled multi-continental database of stratigraphic columns. The analytical result is a data based Genesis Flood model that connects the sedimentary rock record to historical highlights in Genesis Chapter 7’s Flood narrative, with special attention to Flood Days 1, 40, and 150. We conclude that the Flood initiated on Day 1 with the bursting of the fountains of the great deep. The Flood-water continued to rise thereafter until it reached the Ark on Day 40, causing it to float freely. Between days 40 and 150, the water progressively rose until it reached its zenith, covering the highest hills by 15 cubits, where Chapter 7 ends.

Origin of the Physical Laws of Nature

Don DeYoung*

Abstract

The ultimate origin of the physical laws of nature are seldom discussed in science circles. Yet, the regularity of these laws is assumed and depended upon in every scientific endeavor. Some have attempted to explain a spontaneous origin for physical laws; six approaches are described and shown to be deficient. In contrast, Biblical creation provides a refreshing and credible alternative to secular thinking. The laws of nature are closely connected with mathematics, the language of creation. As an example of this physical symbiosis, the insights of German mathematical genius Amalie Emmy Noether (1832–1935) are described. 

The Heart Mountain Conundrum, Part 1: Models of Low Friction Sliding Have Major Problems

John Matthews*

Abstract

Heart Mountain, Wyoming, USA, is a geological puzzle. Paleozoic carbonates overlie much younger Lower Cenozoic rock. So, either several mountain-sized blocks broke apart and slid up to 45 km from where they were originally deposited onto the younger rock or the way the relative ages of the base layer and the blocks are assessed is wrong. This paper, with its partner, examines the issues and problems explaining this proposed event. Part 1 examines three (uniformitarian) models of a low angle slide on a low-friction cushion. In Part 2, another six essential issues, including how the movement started and was sustained over uneven terrain, are examined. The joint conclusion is that present models are seriously inadequate.

A Little Flood Geology Part IV: The Nature of Flood Geology

Peter Klevberg*

Abstract

Floods are a key category of geologic processes, as presented in Part I. Examples of flood-related projects the author has worked on were presented in Part II. Part III showed that geologic paradigms can have negative effects on field work, sometimes causing evolutionists to miss or ignore evidence for relatively recent, catastrophic, regional-toglobal processes. Creationists can become so enamoured with “Flood models” that they can likewise miss evidence of small-scale, slow geologic processes (Part III). Both positions present a false dilemma since both current processes and very different past processes contributed to modern landscapes. In this paper, evidence for megafloods is presented along with peculiarities of scale, evidence for equifinality of disparate processes, and some of the limitations of extrapolating from local floods to megafloods and from regional megafloods to the Deluge. While good analogues are essential, it is also essential to recognize their limitations, especially effects of scale.

Doxological Biodiversity in Job, Chapter 39: God’s Wisdom and Providence as the Caring Creator, Exhibited in the Creation Ecology of Wildlife Pairs

James J.S. Johnson*

Abstract

The Old Testament book of Job contains a “nature sermon,” directly delivered by God Himself, unto Job, in answer to Job’s questions about how Job’s peaceful life was suddenly interrupted by agonizing afflictions and disasters. God’s answers provide a creationist theology of God’s goodness, might, wisdom, and providence. In this “nature sermon,” reported in Job 38–41, God highlights His control over the physical cosmos, then He describes His control over the world of living creatures. Beginning in Job 38:39, God emphasizes how He has caringly planned for and carefully fitted resources for critical needs of His animal creatures, including reproductive success, dietary necessities, resources to facilitate terrestrial and aerial mobility, etc. Accordingly, (a) Job should recognize God’s kind providence as it is wonderfully applied to God’s lesser creatures; (b) Job should recognize that his own humanity is more valuable to God than the lives of wild animals; and (c) Job should patiently depend upon God to work out good outcomes for his life, here and hereafter. To teach these truths (which are later summarized in 1 Peter 4:19) unto Job, God provides these paired illustrations of various animal’s needs and activities: (1) lion and raven; (2) wild mountain goat and cervid doe; (3) wild donkey and rhinoceros; (4) ostrich and horse; (5) hawk and eagle; (6) Behemoth and Leviathan.



FULL ISSUE


Articles

Origin of the Physical Laws of Nature The Heart Mountain Conundrum, Part 1: Models of Low-Friction Sliding Have Major Problems A Little Flood Geology Part IV: The Nature of Flood Geology Doxological Biodiversity in Job, Chapter 39: God’s Wisdom and Providence as the Caring Creator, Exhibited in the Creation Ecology of Wildlife Pairs God Floods Earth, yet Preserves Ark-Borne Humans and Animals: Exegetical and Geological Notes on Genesis Chapter 7 (Open Access) Origin Of The Physical Laws of Nature The Heart Mountain Conundrum, Part 1: Models of Low-Friction Sliding Have Major Problems Doxological Biodiversity in Job, Chapter 39: God’s Wisdom and Providence as the Caring Creator, Exhibited in the Creation Ecology of Wildlife Pairs

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